We don’t need no education…

Hi all, it’s been a while. Winter break is coming to a close and classes will be starting soon, so I thought I would take this opportunity to do my post on the UK education system. (I’m going to focus on higher ed because I really don’t understand the primary and secondary education system. All I know is that it involves something with A-levels, O.W.L.s, and public schools that are really private schools.)

To sum it up, there are some pretty big differences and I like the American system better. Undergraduate degrees at LSE are 3 years and masters are 1. We’re technically on a trimester system with Michaelmas in the fall, Lent in the spring, and Summer in well…late spring. However, you take your finals in Summer term so it’s almost more of a semester system. One of the great benefits of this setup for study abroad students is that we get a 5 week long spring break between Lent and Summer terms plus you get several reading/review weeks before taking finals in Lent term. The downside of all this is you go 10 weeks straight with no breaks during term time and you get out later in the summer which is tricky for juniors because of internships.

Another major difference is we take four year long classes instead of the four or five per semester at BC. In addition, I’m in class about half as much as at BC. Each course typically has an hour long lecture where you listen to a professor talk for an hour and then you go to an hour long class when you go over homework, expand on concepts, and discuss issues from the week’s lecture. I’m not a big fan of this setup. Personally I’ve gotten used to the extra face time at BC to reinforce concepts and absorb knowledge in more manageable morsels. I also think the separation of lecture and discussion destroys some of the continuity you get with the instruction. The classes are taught by grad student TAs, so quality varies greatly. Professors typically aren’t the friendly, helpful types you get at BC. You’ll be lucky if you get a chance to talk to them at all. I don’t know, maybe I’ve been spoiled by BC.

I also don’t like the grading system. They fudge it a little for study abroad students, but for everyone else almost nothing matters except for the final exam. That means there is little incentive to do any work during the year and not surprisingly few people do. Then come spring break and Summer term, it’s mad cramming session that from what I understand puts Bapst cramming to shame. I don’t think this is a really effective way to learn. Most of the finals are selective types where you get a choice of questions to answer so theoretically you could ace a course without ever learning certain concepts. The incentives are really screwed up. You’d think the London School of Economics would have a better understanding of these things.

Of course, not to be completely negative, the British system does give students more independence and responsibility for their work. It also gives students more opportunities to pursue specific topics that interest them. It also gives them more time to focus on internships and extracurriculars (I’ll do another post on student life later). I also like the specialization (although they seem to love the liberal arts education) especially in contrast to the sometimes overwhelming double whammy of the A&S and CSOM cores at BC. That being said, I still prefer the American university system to the British. Now for the curious:

Course I’m taking at LSE

Corporate Finance, Investments, and Financial Markets: Third year finance class that’s half investments, half corporate finance. Pretty typical subject matter, but the investment portion at least has been more theoretical than what most American universities would offer.

Business and Economic Performance since 1945: Britain in International Context: Possibly my most interesting class at LSE. We basically look at why British economic growth has been disappointing since WWII. The school has one of the first economic history departments in the world and I have to say I’ve learned a lot, not only about British economic history but recent British history and society as well. Also I have my best professor at LSE for this class. He kind of reminds me of a British economic history version of John Gallaugher.

Organizational Theory and Behaviour: Those who have taken OB at BC will probably know the story. Interesting class on how to organize and motivate people in the workplace, but a lot of it seems really soft and subjective. Having taken AP Psych in high school, this feels a lot like psychology lite.

Structure of International Society: Your intro to international relations course. Had I planned my schedule better and not taken language courses for fun freshman and sophomore year, I may have worked this into an international studies minor, but as it is it’s purely for fun. IR is interesting especially given the diversity of viewpoints at LSE (discussion on the war in Iraq is going to be great). Again, it seems a little subjective to me with most lectures ending in “we don’t know” and too much of the subject still uses a Cold War mindset.

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2 responses to “We don’t need no education…

  1. Pingback: LSE: Long, Stressful Exams « nocachyblog

  2. Pingback: Wrap-up Part 2: London Grades « nocachyblog

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